Interest rates: While the shorter timeline will help, personal loans often come with higher interest rates than home loans, so you’ll need to evaluate your options carefully. If you have great credit and sufficient income to repay, you might expect a rate well below 10%. Credit cards are also a form of personal loan. Rates on credit cards range from 0% promotions to more than 20% APR for borrowers with bad credit.
Only you can decide if your home improvement or repair is worth it to you. Some homeowners place a higher personal value on enjoying their living space while they occupy the home; for some, it is important to recover a greater percentage of renovation costs when they sell the home. Remember, a number of factors may determine whether you recover some or all of your expenses.
Your credit score: It’s smart to know what are your chances of qualifying before you apply for a loan. Get a free copy of your credit report from each of the major credit-reporting bureaus: Equifax, TransUnion and Experian. You are entitled to one free report a year from each bureau. The most favorable rates go to borrowers with the best credit scores. Every lender you apply with will check your credit score and credit history.
A traditional home improvement loan lets homeowners borrow a lump sum to pay for the necessary labor and materials to complete projects such as remodeling a kitchen or bathroom, adding a swimming pool to the backyard or replacing an aging HVAC system. Credit unions, traditional banks and online lenders offer home improvement loans. These are unsecured loans, meaning the homeowner doesn’t provide any collateral for the loan. As a result, the interest rate will be higher than it would be for a secured loan, such as a home equity loan.
Home improvement loans are unsecured, meaning they’re approved based on the borrower’s credit history and income and do not require collateral. They are offered by online lenders, banks, or credit unions and work similarly to personal loans. Once approved, you’ll receive funding through direct deposit or paper check, and then be able to pay for your building supplies and contractors.

If you tend to have trouble getting out of debt, keeping your finances organized or meeting deadlines, this isn’t a good option for you. Borrowers who are disciplined, detail oriented and spend within their means could find this to be the least expensive option. However, it may not be possible to borrow as much with a credit card as you could with a home equity loan or cash out refinance, depending on how much equity you have and how good your credit is.
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You might be eligible for a Title I Home Improvement Loan. A Title I loan is a great option because it's guaranteed by the FHA in the event that you default, so it's a low-risk loan from the standpoint of the lender. Also, it might be your best bet if you have limited equity in your house because Title I loans under $7,500 don't require any pledge of equity.[3]
Finally, compare those fees carefully. When you meet with a lender, up-front costs will start with a credit report running $50 to $80 and possibly an appraisal, which should cost less than $300. Some lenders use your property-tax valuation, others won't. Often, you can reduce lending fees in a competitive market. And if you're asked for a nonrefundable application fee, beware; reputable lenders try to keep up-front fees low.
A personal line of credit is similar to a personal loan, except that instead of borrowing a lump sum all at once, the borrower can draw upon a line of credit as needed for a certain number of years. A line of credit can help homeowners avoid borrowing more than they need to by letting them access cash only as they need it. But for homeowners who don’t carefully track their borrowing, a line of credit can make it easy to borrow more than intended. Many small draws on the credit line over time can add up to a large total amount borrowed.
Many people turn to home improvement loans even though saving up and paying cash for home improvements is often the least expensive option. After all, when you pay cash, you don’t have to pay interest. However, sometimes home improvements come in the form of emergency repairs, and paying interest on a loan is less costly than saving up to pay cash while your roof leaks for months and causes mold, rot and damaged ceilings that will cost even more to repair later.

Home improvement becomes necessary after few years. To update already existing home money is necessary which can be acquired through home improvement loans. General repairs, repainting, building a swimming pool or a deck, enlarging the existing area of the house or anything similar is done through home improvement loans easily. Home improvements also increase the value of the home. Sometimes though, over improvement is risky. It is difficult to rent a house that is more expensive than other houses in the neighborhood. Mainstream homebuyers do not go for very grand and expensive tastes. So these things have to be considered seriously.


Almost all credit lines have variable interest rates, and if the rate is raised, it can be applied to your existing balance — something credit card companies are not allowed to do. So be sure to check the lender’s offer to see how often, and by how much, it can raise your rate. If you’re not careful, a once-affordable loan balance could become hard to repay.
If you’re interested in applying or would like more information, please review this PDF file, which outlines the various programs that are available to residents. Then complete this pre-application form and send it to Elena Shulman, one of our project managers, at ElenaS@washingtoncountycda.org. She’ll give you a call to to talk about your plans, review the eligibility requirements with you, and make sure that you’re applying for those programs that will be most beneficial for you. Questions? Give Elena a call at 651.202.2823.
Only you can decide if your home improvement or repair is worth it to you. Some homeowners place a higher personal value on enjoying their living space while they occupy the home; for some, it is important to recover a greater percentage of renovation costs when they sell the home. Remember, a number of factors may determine whether you recover some or all of your expenses.
Homeowners looking for ways to pay for a home improvement have a lot of choices. Taking out a home equity loan, doing a cash-out refi or getting a personal loan are just some of the possibilities depending on your personal financial situation. With NerdWallet’s financing calculator, we help you identify the financing choice that saves you the most money.
Doing a cash-out refinance means it will take you longer to pay off your home, but it also gives you access to the lowest possible borrowing rates to pay for home improvements. Lenders typically require homeowners to retain some equity after the cash-out refinance, commonly 20%, so you’ll need to have plenty of equity if you want to pursue this option. You’ll also need to be employed, have a good credit score and meet all the usual requirements to get a mortgage. (For more, see When (And When Not) to Refinance Your Mortgage)
Whether you hire a contractor or take on the work yourself, begin with an accurate estimate of what the project will cost. Lenders will insist on a specific figure before they work with you. If you're hiring a contractor, start with a firm bid, broken down into labor and materials. Then add on 10 percent for surprises. On work you'll do yourself, compile a detailed materials list with quantities, costs, and an accurate total. Include permit fees and equipment rental. Then add a cushion of 20 to 30 percent to be safe. Once you know how much you need to finance your home improvement project, how much will you get? Despite the promises and hype lenders make in their ads and promotional materials, how much you can borrow hinges on your credit rating, the loan-to-value ratio, and your income. These factors also help determine the interest rate, the length of the loan, and whether you'll pay points. Your credit rating. The best rates and terms go to homeowners with an A rating—no late payments in the last 12 months and no maxed-out credit cards. One or two late payments or overdrawn credit cards probably won't knock you out of the game, but you might end up with a higher interest rate and a smaller loan.
Homeowners looking for ways to pay for a home improvement have a lot of choices. Taking out a home equity loan, doing a cash-out refi or getting a personal loan are just some of the possibilities depending on your personal financial situation. With NerdWallet’s financing calculator, we help you identify the financing choice that saves you the most money.
It's been a few years since I painted anything in anger, but back when I did, there was a trick I'd use when protecting carpet. Round the edge of the carpet, right up against the baseboard, I'd run a 1 1/2 or 2 painter's tape, and let the tape stick slightly to the board. Then I'd go round with the broadest taping knife I had, and tuck the tape down hard. That left the carpet edge protected and rounded over and the tape was now creating a line along the baseboard *below* the level of the carpet. Then I'd sheet up as usual.That made it super easy to paint the baseboard, the bottom edge didn't need cutting in! Just work the pain in there! If the bottom edge was a little messy and uneven, who cared? Once the paint was thoroughly dry, the tape was lifted (carefully, to not pull the carpet off the gripper) and the carpet would bounce up and hide the bottom edge of the paint. A perfect look, quicker and safer than trying to cut in along a fuzzy carpet edge.
A home equity/Line of credit, a closed end 2nd mortgage, an after-value loan or a host of other equity products are the options available for home improvement loans. What are the improvements to be made, the period it will take to complete and the amount of equity available are the important considerations to be made before going for a home improvement loan.

Home improvement loans are unsecured, meaning they’re approved based on the borrower’s credit history and income and do not require collateral. They are offered by online lenders, banks, or credit unions and work similarly to personal loans. Once approved, you’ll receive funding through direct deposit or paper check, and then be able to pay for your building supplies and contractors.

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