If you have equity in your home and are planning on projects costing $50,000 or more, the best loans to tap will probably be tied to your property. HELOCs, home equity loans, and cash out refinances offer the best rates (30-year fixed mortgage rates are among the lowest we've seen in decades, at 4.06% . A 15-year fixed home loan is currently 3.12%, according to WSJ.) Also, you might be able to deduct the interest on these loans and any points you pay to reduce the interest rate on your taxes (check with a tax advisor, though).


If you tend to have trouble getting out of debt, keeping your finances organized or meeting deadlines, this isn’t a good option for you. Borrowers who are disciplined, detail oriented and spend within their means could find this to be the least expensive option. However, it may not be possible to borrow as much with a credit card as you could with a home equity loan or cash out refinance, depending on how much equity you have and how good your credit is.
SoFi is known for student loan refinancing, but the online lender also offers personal loans for house remodeling. You can borrow as little as $5,000 or as much as $100,000 and repay it over two to seven years. SoFi loans also come without origination fees and prepayment penalties. They even have an unemployment protection program that can temporarily pause your payments if you lose your job.
Home equity loans are a second mortgage on your home. They're usually a fixed interest rate for the life of the loan, and you get the money in one lump sum. Terms vary, but many home equity loans have you pay back the principle and interest within 15 years with monthly payment plans. This might be the best option if you need a set amount of money for something important and have enough room in your budget to make the payments, of course.
To determine the loan amount, lenders use the loan-to-value ratio (LTV), which is a percentage of the appraisal value of your home. The usual limit is 80 percent—or $100,000 for a $125,000 home (.805125,000). Lenders subtract the mortgage balance from that amount to arrive at the maximum you can borrow. Assuming your balance is $60,000, the largest loan that you can obtain is $40,000 ($100,000-$60,000=$40,000). If you have a good credit rating, a lender might base your loan on more than 80 percent of the LTV; if you don't, you might get only 65 to 70 percent. While many lenders go to 100 percent of the LTV, interest rates and fees soar at these higher ratios.
To qualify for a home remodeling loan, you will need a good credit score and enough monthly income to comfortably pay for all of your debts, including the monthly loan payment. While qualifying for remodeling loans isn’t as difficult as qualifying for a mortgage, “lenders will be very diligent about verifying debt ratios,” McBride said. So, be prepared to supply a lot of paperwork to prove your financial standing.
If you have planned a renovation with a mock budget and know what the end total looks like, a good first step is to evaluate whether it's feasible to fund with cash. Creating this budget will not only help you pinpoint your expenses, but if you end up going with a loan, it will be an integral step in showing lenders that you’re prepared for the renovations.
A home equity/Line of credit, a closed end 2nd mortgage, an after-value loan or a host of other equity products are the options available for home improvement loans. What are the improvements to be made, the period it will take to complete and the amount of equity available are the important considerations to be made before going for a home improvement loan.

If you tend to have trouble getting out of debt, keeping your finances organized or meeting deadlines, this isn’t a good option for you. Borrowers who are disciplined, detail oriented and spend within their means could find this to be the least expensive option. However, it may not be possible to borrow as much with a credit card as you could with a home equity loan or cash out refinance, depending on how much equity you have and how good your credit is.
A home improvement loan calculator can help you budget your project and determine potential loan payments. If you are thinking of updating your home, you may be interested to know that there are home improvement loan calculators online to help a homeowner determine what the payments will roughly be for a particular amount taken out. With a home improvement loan calculator, a potential homeowner who is interested in updating their home will be able to see how much home improvement loan rates will be based on the interest. These home improvement loan calculators are very easy to use. They will help to figure out an approximate cost based on the home improvement loan rates that are offered by the lender. Simply enter the loan amount, the time frame, interest rate, and the first due date, click submit and the online calculator will do the rest of the work for you. These calculators make it quite nice to compare how much you can save when you accelerate your payments and pay the loan down faster than the original schedule. Using this calculator is a smart option for homeowners who wish to see what options they really have, and to see what they can truly afford.

If you’re interested in applying or would like more information, please review this PDF file, which outlines the various programs that are available to residents. Then complete this pre-application form and send it to Elena Shulman, one of our project managers, at ElenaS@washingtoncountycda.org. She’ll give you a call to to talk about your plans, review the eligibility requirements with you, and make sure that you’re applying for those programs that will be most beneficial for you. Questions? Give Elena a call at 651.202.2823.
The advent of online lending portals has made it easy for borrowers without collateral to get an unsecured personal loan from both national and local lenders. The rates for this type of debt are significantly higher than for home equity debt; on Bankrate, average APRs for personal loans range from a low of 10.3 percent for someone with excellent credit—a FICO cedit score of 720 and higher—to 32 percent for someone with poor credit.
Before applying, be sure to check your credit history for inaccuracies, and if you find any, dispute them. You’ll want to make sure your credit is in tip top shape so you can get the best rate from lenders. If your credit score is subprime, consider a bad credit loan instead. It’s also important to get a few estimates prior to applying for a loan so you have an idea of how much money you need to get the job done.
Great tips. At the onset of explaining various causes of a squeak, Tom Silva says it can be alignment, either of the door-to-hinge, or hinge-to-hinge. Hmm, seems to me those two scenarios different than the case in the vid, that being singular hinge with the barrels out of alignment. So, the vid shows a great solution to fixing out of alignment barrels, but what about fixing doors with hinges out of alignment from each other, or hinges out of alighment on the door? How do you make that determinations, and what is the solution? thx
The biggest problem or obstacle to getting home improvement projects done? Contractors. Many people research DIY solutions but do so not to perform the work themselves but to have some knowledge when hiring someone else to do it for them.Where are the articles on the realities of dealing with contractors, not the glossed over 1,2,3... steps which are hardly helpful in the experiences of so many?Perhaps TOH can shine a bit of light of what no one really wants to talk about on the side of sites selling ads, displaying links to Home advisor and those types of hyped up services?Maybe TOH could spend a little bit of time advocating better service providers than displaying their ads everywhere?Most people know the usuals, the defined scope, the quotes and so on. How many contractors can easily pass a reference check and then the home owner discovers the work is shoddy, the communication practically non-existent and the contractors think it's their project? It's the homeowners project.
To determine the loan amount, lenders use the loan-to-value ratio (LTV), which is a percentage of the appraisal value of your home. The usual limit is 80 percent—or $100,000 for a $125,000 home (.805125,000). Lenders subtract the mortgage balance from that amount to arrive at the maximum you can borrow. Assuming your balance is $60,000, the largest loan that you can obtain is $40,000 ($100,000-$60,000=$40,000). If you have a good credit rating, a lender might base your loan on more than 80 percent of the LTV; if you don't, you might get only 65 to 70 percent. While many lenders go to 100 percent of the LTV, interest rates and fees soar at these higher ratios.

If you’re interested in applying or would like more information, please review this PDF file, which outlines the various programs that are available to residents. Then complete this pre-application form and send it to Elena Shulman, one of our project managers, at ElenaS@washingtoncountycda.org. She’ll give you a call to to talk about your plans, review the eligibility requirements with you, and make sure that you’re applying for those programs that will be most beneficial for you. Questions? Give Elena a call at 651.202.2823.
Home improvement loans are unsecured, meaning they’re approved based on the borrower’s credit history and income and do not require collateral. They are offered by online lenders, banks, or credit unions and work similarly to personal loans. Once approved, you’ll receive funding through direct deposit or paper check, and then be able to pay for your building supplies and contractors.
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